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    Broadcast Dialogue.
    Lisa Williams is celebrating her 30th anniversary on-air in Windsor. Williams began as the traffic reporter at CKWW-AM in 1987 while still in high school, joining Cam Gardiner on The Cam and Lisa Show for 16 years. Since 2003, she’s been co-hosting The Morning Drive on Bell Media’s AM800 CKLW with Mike Kakuk, which has bee…[Read more]

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    Radio Personality Delilah Honored at Day Two of 2017 NAB Show.

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    Winners CMA Radio Awards

    Complete List of 2017 Canadian Music and Broadcast Industry Awards Winners
    Broadcast Industry:

    MUSIC DIRECTOR MAJOR
    Lynch – X929 – Calgary and Wayne Webster – Boom 97.3 – Toronto

    MUSIC DIRECTOR SECONDARY
    Barry Stewart – Live 105/Hot Country 103.5 – Halifax

    MUSIC DIRECTOR SMALL
    Scott McGregor – 98.1 The Bridge – Lethbridge

    ON AIR MAJOR
    Garner Andrews – Sonic 102.9 – Edmonton

    ON AIR SECONDARY
    Biggs & Barr – HTZ-FM – St. Catharines

    PROGRAM DIRECTOR MAJOR
    Christian Hall – X929 – Calgary

    PROGRAM DIRECTOR SECONDARY
    Sarah Cummings – K-Lite/105.7 EZ Rock – Hamilton/St. Catharines

    PROGRAM DIRECTOR SMALL
    Jenn Dalen – Real Country 95.5 – Red Deer

    PROMOTION
    May The Best Friends Win – Indie 88 – Toronto

    STATION SMALL
    99.9 Sun FM – Kelowna

    STATION COUNTRY
    BX93 – London

    STATION CHR
    99.9 Virgin Radio – Toronto

    STATION AC
    98.1 CHFI – Toronto

    STATION ROCK
    INDIE 88 – Toronto

    STATION CLASSIC GOLD
    Boom 97.3 – Toronto

    STATION MULTICULTURAL
    CHIN – Toronto

    STATION NEWS TALK SPORTS
    680 NEWS – Toronto

    STATION MEDIUM
    104.9 The Wolf – Regina

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    The Airchecker Radio Journey Series – Tom Mcgouran

    The Airchecker Radio Journey Series – Tom Mcgouran
    www.airchecker.ca/2017/03/12/airchecker-radio-journey-series-tom-mcgouran/

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    A radio personality can be someone who introduces and discusses genres of music; hosts a talk radio show that may take calls from listeners; interviews celebrities or guests; or gives news, weather, sports, or traffic information.

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    Corus Careers

    Corus believes that its employees are the cornerstone of the company. Creating a work environment that embodies the Corus’ Core Values of Accountability, Initiative, Innovation, Knowledge and Teamwork, foster a collaborative and inclusive culture and encourages a passion for learning, which fuels personal, professional and corporate growth. We are proud to be recognized as one of Canada’s Top 100 Employers for 2016, Canada’s Top Employers for Young People for 2016, Canada’s Best Diversity Employers for 2015 and Greater Toronto’s Top Employers for 2016.

    Corus is committed to providing a fair and equitable work environment and encourages applications from qualified women, men, visible minorities, aboriginal peoples and persons with disabilities.

    www.corusent.com/corus-careers/

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    Whether you’ve listened to her show on the radio airwaves over the past 33 years or you’re a new fan, tuning in to catch her velvet voice and sympathetic ear via the Conversations with Delilah app or the IHeart Radio app, the name Delilah is instantly recognizable—as is her slogan, “slow down and love someone.” She’s the best friend you wish yo…[Read more]

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    Niagara College Broadcasting Students Win National Awards

    By NEWSTALK 610 CKTB

    Just weeks before graduating from Niagara College’s three-year Broadcasting – Radio, Television and Film program, Rachel Hodges along with Brandon Primmer were each honoured with a National Student Award from the Broadcast Educators Association of Canada.

    The BEAC awards recognize the unique combination of creativity and technical excellence demonstrated by students in radio, television, video and new media.

    Welland residents Primmer and Hodges both won the awards for work they completed as part of their studies: Primmer in the video category for his music video, “Let Yourself Go,” and Hodges in the audio category for her newscast that aired live in December on NC’s student radio station, CRNC The Heat.

    Primmer, who is originally from Owen Sound, created the music video for his film production class.

    He currently works as a videographer in Hamilton for AMV Productions and hopes to run his own production company someday specializing in music and corporate videos or commercials.

    Hodges, who is originally from Orillia, said she was grateful for the award and the experience she gained in all three streams of the College’s Broadcasting program – radio, television and film.

    “It has always been my goal to work in the news industry so being able to add a national news award to my resume will certainly be beneficial in the future,” said Hodges, who is currently putting her education to work in the field as an intern reporter at 610 CKTB. “It will help me stand out among a number of other talented and qualified applicants which is important in such a small and competitive industry.”

    At the end of May, the students were accompanied to Halifax by BRTF professors Bruce Gilbert and Peter VandenBerg to receive their awards.

    “Seeing our students win national awards reinforces that our Broadcasting – Radio, Television and Film program produces high-quality grads that leave with the tools necessary to get great jobs,” said Gilbert. “It was a privilege to represent Niagara College that night.”

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    Corus Shuffles Its Deck, Reorganizes

    Corus Entertainment has given birth to a new combined structure following the integration of Shaw Media into its fold.

    Under the reorg the media and entertainment company has developed five teams to lead its sales, marketing, content, international and communications work.

    The client marketing team will be led, as earlier announced, by Barb McKergow. A team of seven people will report to McKergow, with Lynn Chambers, former VP of content marketing slipping into a newly created role as senior director, branded entertainment and experience, according to an internal memo obtained by MiC.

    Emma Fachini and Mary Lepage both continue in their roles as directors, sales for client marketing.

    Bruce Shepherd is moving from his position as senior manager, marketing ventures to manager, regional sales for British Columbia, a role in which he will responsible for agency-facing integrations and sales for the Vancouver market.

    Dave Rigby, also formerly a manager for marketing ventures, will take on the same role as Shepherd for Western Canada, including Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

    Tracy Christopher is in a newly created role as director, digital production and client services. In her previous role she was director, creative and production, broadcast and interactive, client marketing for TV sales.

    Trevor Williams retains his position as director of production for branded sales content.

    The digital sales team will be led by Brett Pearson and will work in partnership with the overall sales team to develop multiplatform opportunities.

    Dean Shoukas and Lyna Sapijonis join the team as senior manager, digital sales. Sapijonis was part of the Shaw Media team in the same position.

    Philippe Kleime has been promoted from director of ad opps to director platforms and strategy. In his new role, Kleime is tasked with strategy for a digital roadmap and to oversee digital vendor partnerships.

    Whitney Bloom stays in the role of monetization strategist.

    Content distribution, which was previously under the leadership of Maria Hale, now goes to Shawn Praskey. Praskey was previously VP for content distribution. A team of four will report to him, with Drew Robinson continuing as director, content distribution and Beate Jack moving from that role into director of affiliate marketing. Hale now leads content and strategy for Global Entertainment.

    Corus’ former VP of research has moved into the role of lead for its research and consumer insights division. This division has been providing advertisers with key data based on information from its Audience Intelligence Platform as well as surveys and in-house research conducted by its team.

    Most of the team here remains the same, with the exception of David Bennett, who has been given the rank of senior director, digital audience insights and engagement. In his prior role he was in a VP position for audience engagement and development.

    The revenue optimization team will be lead by Tammy Baird, with no changes planned at the moment for the revenue team. Those changes may come in early 2017 when the traffic and sales teams are integrated.

    Brand and marketing strategy will be led by Susan Shaefer in a new role as SVP, brands and marketing. Shaefer was previously EVP, marketing and corporate communications; she heads a team of five. On her team is Jim Johnson, who moves from the role of VP, payTV and affiliate marketing to VP, marketing global.

    While most of the changes involve a staff shuffle from within Corus, the company’s in-house media agency will be led by a Shaw employee. Scott MacLeod, who was previously senior director of marketing, media planning at Shaw Media has stepped into that role.

    Byron Garby has been confirmed as general sales manager, national radio, and will report to Gerry Mackrell, VP of sales.

    At the local level, sales will be led by Mike Season, who was formerly director of sales, Corus Radio, Vancouver.

    Read more: mediaincanada.com/2016/05/11/corus-shuffles-its-deck-reorganizes/#ixzz4AAJ2pKsA

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    SiriusXM Canada Going Private in $367 Million Deal

    SiriusXM has announced an agreement with SirusXM Canada, where the Canadian satcaster will be going private as its U.S. counterpart increases its stake in the company. The deal is valued at $367 million. The deal will see SiriusXM and controlling shareholder Liberty Media increase its stake in SiriusXM Canada from 37 percent to 70 percent, which gives it approximately 30 percent of its voting shares.

    The rest of its equity and voting stakes will be held by Canadian broadcaster Slaight Communications Inc and private equity firm Obelysk Media. The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation will no longer be a shareholder in Sirius XM Canada following the transaction. According to Reuters, the CBC was SiriusXM Canada’s second-largest shareholder.

    “This proposed transaction shows SiriusXM’s and SiriusXM Canada’s commitment to serving the Canadian market with our leading bundle of premium content, much of which will continue to be created in Canada. The existing Canada-led governance structure will be preserved while vastly improving cooperation between the two companies on next generation products and services that will ensure a healthy future for satellite radio in Canada,” said Jim Meyer, SiriusXM CEO. “While the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation will cease to be a shareholder in SiriusXM Canada following the transaction, it will continue to support the company as a programming provider.”

    SiriusXM expects to contribute approximately $275 million (in U.S. dollars) to facilitate the transaction. Additionally, the licensing and services agreements between SiriusXM and SiriusXM Canada will be renewed and extended upon the consummation of the proposed transaction.

    The deal is subject to approval of the SiriusXM Canada shareholders, receipt of Canadian regulatory approvals, and other customary closing conditions. SiriusXM expects the deal to close no later than the end of the fourth quarter of 2016, upon which time SiriusXM Canada will no longer be a publicly traded stock.

    – See more at: www.fmqb.com/Article.asp?id=3007467#sthash.hkZHZLKK.dpuf

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    Internet Free Streaming Days Are Gone

    Under new regulations, internet-only radio will be charged more for rights to play music. (Carolyn Duff / The DePaulia)
    This past December the Copyright Royalty Board, the group responsible for overseeing copyrights and royalty payments through the Library of Congress, announced new rates for music played via the Internet. To be clear, this impacts online-only radio stations, not FM and AM radio, or satellite radio.

    The new law significantly increases the cost a station pays each time a song is played. In the world of streaming and Internet radio, having more listeners is not always a good thing. The more people tuning in, the more money the station owes.

    The discussion of how musical artists are compensated for music played digitally has become an increasingly visible topic. Last year artists such as Taylor Swift and Adele made headlines for holding out on streaming services that some argue do not pay artists enough.

    The extra money from Internet stations may be a nice boost to the artists receiving airplay, but consider some of the groups that will have to foot the bill.

    Radio DePaul, the university’s Internet only radio station, is not spared from the increase. Unlike some other local colleges or high schools with an FM radio station, Radio DePaul operates solely online, and therefore receives no special or educational licensing from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

    “We are an educational college station, even though that’s not official,” Radio DePaul faculty advisor Scott Vyverman said. “The FCC doesn’t recognize or oversee streaming radio, educational or otherwise. While we know who we are and why DePaul supports our operation and further know that we shouldn’t be held to the same copyright fee rates as Pandora, the Copyright Royalty Board has seen fit to lump us together. If we had a license, we would navigate and deal with this differently.”

    One step the station could take would be to reduce the amount of music played on the station, though that would fundamentally alter the content. The other option would be to consider fundraising tactics. Vyverman hopes to take neither road.

    “Focusing more on fundraising would not be something that I would welcome. It would fundamentally change who we are. We will cross that bridge if we have to, but for now, we are looking to deal with the hand we’ve been dealt,” he said.

    Beyond the implications the new copyright laws may have on the university’s radio station, the new laws ultimately are a burden to those seeking content that cannot be found elsewhere.

    Internet radio has offered listeners some salvation from commercial radio. Niche formats have been able to find small, active communities online where artists can continue to receive airplay and reach fans.

    Veteran Chicago program director and DJ Rick O’Dell operated an Internet-based smooth jazz radio station for three years after the format was left without a home on Chicago radio. O’Dell filled the void for listeners until shutting the station down on Jan. 1, when the increased rates went into effect.

    But it is not so much an “us” versus “them” mentality between broadcasters and artists.

    “The law isn’t counterproductive, because artists deserve compensation,” O’Dell said. “Internet broadcasters who were running their businesses as a serious, legitimate enterprise appreciate that artists deserve to be paid.”

    “In many ways I preferred to see those dollars go into an artist’s pocket as opposed to a faceless corporation.  The new royalty increases weren’t equitably applied.  That’s the problem I have with it, not the fact that I have to pay royalties in the first place,” said O’Dell.

    Unfortunately, it can be a double-edged sword. Artists can only receive royalties if someone is listening to their music via an online station. An online station can only operate and play the music if it can afford to.

    It is in the Internet broadcasters’ best interests to no longer do it alone. Instead of operating as independent entities, some organization on the part of Internet stations could go a long way in influencing future changes.

    “If Internet broadcasters had been better organized, we at least could have had a seat at the table,” O’Dell said. “As it was, we weren’t represented at all.  That’s not the fault of the FCC or CRB.  That’s our fault.  You can’t influence the results of the game if you’re not in the game.”

    Without representation or organization, the Internet radio industry will continue to have to abide by laws in which they had no say in crafting.

    For stations like Radio DePaul, there is some hope that other educational based outlets could join forces.

    “Thankfully we have the Intercollegiate Broadcasting System on our side. They are fighting the good fight for us and I hope that they will continue to appeal and argue on behalf of all college stations, especially the streaming-only stations,” Vyverman said.

    Otherwise, voices and content lacking representation on traditional radio risk being silenced by the new payment

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    Cheap talent in prime slots reflects a sizzled out of touch vision.

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    Jocks make radio stations win. Radio talent personalty sparkles the station as a winner. Listeners fall in love with favorite personality. Local reflection on community with personality to drive up ratings. Radio carrears are 5 years producing clone station delivery. Canadian corporate radio in a box for cloned programmed format. Programmers…[Read more]

  • Profile picture of Airchecker Airchecker

    Jocks make radio stations win. Radio talent personalty sparkles the station as a winner. Listeners fall in love with favorite personality. Local reflection on community with personality to drive up ratings. Radio carrears are 5 years producing clone station delivery. Canadian corporate radio in a box for cloned programmed format. Programmers…[Read more]

  • Profile picture of Airchecker Airchecker

    Jocks make radio stations win. Radio talent personalty sparkles the station as a winner. Listeners fall in love with favorite personality. Local reflection on community with personality to drive up ratings. Radio carrears are 5 years producing clone station delivery. Canadian corporate radio in a box for cloned programmed format. Programmers…[Read more]

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    What’s up you radio jock. A career in radio today is short lived. Expect more personality radio talent gutted from corporate radio. New radio faces challah from new tech who think forward. Radio slow to react and stall on trying new adventure. Programmers stick to safety nets from proven winners. Radio future does have a end date. Net radio will…[Read more]

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    What’s up you radio jock. A career in radio today is short lived. Expect more personality radio talent gutted from corporate radio. New radio faces challah from nr3

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    Jian Ghomeshi

    TORONTO – He was a broadcasting star with a wide and loyal following before he became engulfed in a scandal that sparked a nationwide conversation on sexual assault and the issues with reporting it.

    Now, more than a year since the allegations against Jian sent shock waves across the country, his highly anticipated trial is set to begin in Toronto on Monday.

    Ghomeshi – the former host of CBC radio’s popular culture show “Q” – has pleaded not guilty to four counts of sexual assault and one count of overcoming resistance by choking.

    The judge-alone trial, which is expected to last several weeks, involves three complainants and will be closely watched by many across the country.

    “Radio is a very intimate medium and he was going into people’s living rooms five days a week,” said Marsha Barber, a journalism professor at Toronto’s Ryerson University.

    “He was very influential and he had a huge listenership. Anybody who listened to him regularly is going to feel that they have a stake in what happened.”

    The controversy around Ghomeshi surfaced on Oct. 24, 2014, when the CBC first said he was taking time off from his duties “to deal with some personal issues.” Two days later, the public broadcaster said it had cut ties with the popular host.

    In a lengthy Facebook message posted on the same day, Ghomeshi said he’d been fired because of “a campaign of false allegations.” He also said that while he engaged in “rough sex” and “adventurous forms of sex that included role-play, dominance and submission,” he only participated in sexual practices that were “mutually agreed upon, consensual, and exciting for both partners.”

    In a separate Facebook post, he vowed to meet the allegations against him “directly.”

    Five days after he was fired from the CBC, Toronto police said they were investigating Ghomeshi after two women had come forward with complaints. On the same day, the CBC issued a memo to staff saying it had seen “graphic evidence” that Ghomeshi had caused physical harm to a woman.

    One of the women who contacted police was Lucy DeCoutere, an actress on the TV show “Trailer Park Boys,” who was the first to speak on the record about her alleged experiences with Ghomeshi.

    DeCoutere, – the only one of the complainants at Ghomeshi’s trial who can be publicly identified – accused the 48-year-old of choking her “to the point she could not breathe” and slapping her “hard three times on the side of her head.”

    On Nov. 26, a month after he was fired from the CBC, Ghomeshi was charged with four counts of sexual assault and one count of overcoming resistance by choking. He was released on $100,000 bail and was ordered to live with his mother.

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    Jian Ghomeshi

    TORONTO – He was a broadcasting star with a wide and loyal following before he became engulfed in a scandal that sparked a nationwide conversation on sexual assault and the issues with reporting it.

    Now, more than a year since the allegations against Jian sent shock waves across the country, his highly anticipated trial is set to begin in Toronto on Monday.

    Ghomeshi – the former host of CBC radio’s popular culture show “Q” – has pleaded not guilty to four counts of sexual assault and one count of overcoming resistance by choking.

    The judge-alone trial, which is expected to last several weeks, involves three complainants and will be closely watched by many across the country.

    “Radio is a very intimate medium and he was going into people’s living rooms five days a week,” said Marsha Barber, a journalism professor at Toronto’s Ryerson University.

    “He was very influential and he had a huge listenership. Anybody who listened to him regularly is going to feel that they have a stake in what happened.”

    The controversy around Ghomeshi surfaced on Oct. 24, 2014, when the CBC first said he was taking time off from his duties “to deal with some personal issues.” Two days later, the public broadcaster said it had cut ties with the popular host.

    In a lengthy Facebook message posted on the same day, Ghomeshi said he’d been fired because of “a campaign of false allegations.” He also said that while he engaged in “rough sex” and “adventurous forms of sex that included role-play, dominance and submission,” he only participated in sexual practices that were “mutually agreed upon, consensual, and exciting for both partners.”

    In a separate Facebook post, he vowed to meet the allegations against him “directly.”

    Five days after he was fired from the CBC, Toronto police said they were investigating Ghomeshi after two women had come forward with complaints. On the same day, the CBC issued a memo to staff saying it had seen “graphic evidence” that Ghomeshi had caused physical harm to a woman.

    One of the women who contacted police was Lucy DeCoutere, an actress on the TV show “Trailer Park Boys,” who was the first to speak on the record about her alleged experiences with Ghomeshi.

    DeCoutere, – the only one of the complainants at Ghomeshi’s trial who can be publicly identified – accused the 48-year-old of choking her “to the point she could not breathe” and slapping her “hard three times on the side of her head.”

    On Nov. 26, a month after he was fired from the CBC, Ghomeshi was charged with four counts of sexual assault and one count of overcoming resistance by choking. He was released on $100,000 bail and was ordered to live with his mother.

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    Red Robinson: Fearless Freddie Signs Off

    Years ago when I was Program Director at C-FUN someone asked me about Fred Latremouille. My response was “Once in a lifetime someone comes along with great talent, great looks and an all round professional who could do just about everything. But why did he have to come along in my lifetime?” It was a joke because Fred and I were friends and I could get away with it.

    Carole and I returned from Palm Springs Thursday night to hundreds of emails with the news that Fred had died. It was a shock… and yet in a way it wasn’t. Fred emailed 10 days before we took off for the desert that he had bad news from his doctor. His liver was damaged and he would have to stop drinking wine or pay the ultimate price. In typical Fred fashion he concluded the email by saying, “But I love my wine!” That last sentence was scary. The habit started years ago when he suffered from various ailments related to his early cancer radiation. It eventually prevented him from playing golf as the post-radiation affected his bones. He never gave up swimming and made a habit of going every day.

    When Fred was first diagnosed with cancer, he must have been in his early 20’s. My late son Jeff and I would visit him at his mother’s home in West Vancouver. Fred never forgot the visits. He really took a liking to Jeff and always asked about him.

    In the early 60’s Fred and I co-hosted CBC‘s national TV show Let’s Go. It was a great opportunity for the two of us to work together, and we became friends with many on the show including Terry and Susan Jacks, Howie Vickers, Miles Ramsay and so many great and talented people.

    In 1993 I decided to do morning radio again, this time on CISL. By that time AM was losing music listeners to FM. Fred was a great competitor on KISS FM and by then he was the number one radio personality in the city.

    Read on blog.redrobinson.com/?p=4942

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